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Berlin (Germany)

Berlin State, Land Berlin

Last modified: 2004-12-29 by
Keywords: germany | berlin | land berlin | bear (black) | crown: mural (red) | bordure (red) | coat of arms (bear: black) |
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[Civil Flag (Berlin, Germany)] 3:5 | stripes 1+3+1
by Marcus Schmöger
Flag adopted 13th May 1954 for West Berlin, 1990 for all Berlin



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Introduction

(West) Berlin adopted its flag on 26th May 1954, based on a design by Ottfried Neubecker who was second place in the contest of 1952; the Senate rejected the winning design.

Jaume Ollé (?), 17 May 1998

The bear on the flag and coat of arms of Berlin represents the first half of the city's name, German Bär meaning bear. In English we call this sort of pun canting arms.

John Ayer, 13 October 1999

I have heard a version that adds to the pun by making it a bärlein, i.e. little bear.

Joseph McMillan, 13 October 1999


Civil Flag

Landesflagge

[Civil Flag (Berlin, Germany)] 3:5 | stripes 1+3+1
by Marcus Schmöger
Flag adopted 13th May 1954 for West Berlin, 1990 for all Berlin

The civil flag is a horizontal tricolour of red-white-red, the ratio of the stripes is 1:3:1; in the white stripe somewhat shifted to the hoist there is the black bear from the coat-of-arms, without the escutcheon. This design was introduced in 1954 for West Berlin, in 1990 with the reunification of the city also for East Berlin. My image is made after the drawings attached to the law.

Marcus Schmöger, 19 September 2001


Civil Flag, Vertical Variant

Banner

[Civil Flag, Vertical Variant (Berlin, Germany)] | stripes 1+3+1
by Marcus Schmöger

The law also mentions the vertical variant (Banner) of the civil flag, but does not give a drawing. However, Laitenberger and Bassier 2000 shows a drawing, after which I made the above image.

Marcus Schmöger, 19 September 2001


State Flag (also used as jack by state vessels)

Allgemeine Dienstflagge

[State Flag, also jack on state vessels (Berlin, Germany)] 3:5 | stripes 1+3+1
by Marcus Schmöger
Flag adopted 13th May 1954

State flag: (...) proportions 3:5, adopted 13th May 1954.

Pascal Vagnat, 19 December 1995 and 14 December 1997

The service flag, in the size of 15 × 25 cm, is used by the president of the revenue court, the presidents of the supreme courts, the directors of the Senate, the mayors of the city's districts and the president of the police. Source: personal and legal archives, with legislation and official documents from the German Länder, as well as the informations of Jürgen Rimann, the best German specialist for all the car flags in the world and a very reliable source.

Pascal Vagnat, 1 August 1999

The state flag is the same as the civil flag, but shows the whole arms instead of the bear alone. The arms are the black bear in a silver (white) escutcheon under a golden crown. This design was introduced in 1954 for West Berlin, in 1990 with the reunification of the city also for East Berlin. As West Berlin had a special status until 1990, the state flag was also used as a state ensign (e.g. for police boats), as the German state ensign could not be used as such. Since 1990 the German state ensign is used as such and the Berlin state flag is used as a jack on state vessels as usual in other Länder. My image is made after the drawings attached to the law.

Marcus Schmöger, 19 September 2001


Car Flag for Authorities

Dienstflagge der Mitglieder des Senats

[Car Flag for Authorities (Berlin, Germany)] 1:1 | 25 × 25 cm
by Marcus Schmöger
Flag adopted 13th May 1954

The members of the senate, as well as the city mayor, have their own flag which is white with a red border and the coat of arms in the middle, dimensions 25 × 25 cm.

Pascal Vagnat, 1 August 1999

The flag for the members of the Senate (government) is actually their car flag, used by the Regierender Bürgermeister (prime minister/mayor) and the Senatoren (ministers). It is a white square with a red border as wide as 2/15ths of the flag height, and in the white field the arms. The drawings attached to the law shows the arms in this case in silver [metallic shade], not in white, so I made the image accordingly. As this is a car flag, it is not improbable that actual flags would have the arms embroidered, so that the silver would actually be silver and perhaps the gold would actually be gold.

Marcus Schmöger, 19 September 2001


Sources

Sources:

Marcus Schmöger, 19 September 2001

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