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Grand Ducal Standards c.1903-1918 (Hesse, Germany)

Grand Duke of Hesse and the Rhine, Grossherzog von Hessen und bei Rhein

Last modified: 2004-12-29 by
Keywords: hesse | grand duke | grossherzog | grand duchess | grossherzogin | heir grand duke | erbgrossherzog | banner of arms | lion: rampant (striped) | bordure (white) |
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[Standard of the Grand Duke c.1903-1918 (Hesse, Germany)] 1:1
Standard of the Grand Duke
by Theo van der Zalm and Santiago Dotor
Flag adopted c.1903, abandoned 1918



See also:


Introduction

Probably on occasion of issuing the new state arms in 1902 new princely standards [in the form of armorial banners] were also adopted.

Theo van der Zalm, 24 August 2000


Standard of the Grand Duke c.1903-1918

Standarte des Grossherzogs

[Standard of the Grand Duke c.1903-1918 (Hesse, Germany)] 1:1
by Theo van der Zalm and Santiago Dotor
Flag adopted c.1903, abandoned 1918

Banner of (the lesser) arms of Hesse. Illustrated in Crampton 1990 p. 44.

Norman Martin, April 1998

In Crampton 1990's illustration the effect [of a 'wavy' sword] comes from the design of the flag that shows it waving. This is the standard that replaced the previous one in 1903. The shade of blue [should be the same in all these Hesse coats-of-arms].

Mario Fabretto, 25 August 1998

The standard of the grand duke showed the lion with sword bearing an ancient count's crown. Source: Neubecker 1933.

Theo van der Zalm, 24 August 2000

The colour blue used for Hesse has been in dispute for two centuries now. In black and white there is no distinction at all of course. Many books have only one colour blue used in printing. Ströhl 1897 for instance uses the same colour blue for Hesse and Nassau in the arms of the Prussian province Hesse-Nassau however Nassau blue is traditionally dark. The same problem occurs with the Dutch and Luxemburg flags. While the Dutch one is Nassau-(marine)-blue, the Luxemburg flag is a lighter shade, sky blue.

Theo van der Zalm, 20 June 2001

For the field I used dark blue, as suggested by the drawing in Neubecker 1933.

Santiago Dotor, 25 June 2002


Standard of the Grand Duchess c.1903-1918

Standarte der Grossherzogin

[Standard of the Grand Duchess c.1903-1918 (Hesse, Germany)] 1:1
by Theo van der Zalm and Santiago Dotor
Flag adopted c.1903, abandoned 1918

The grand duchess flew the same lion as the grand duke within a white border with red squares in the corners. Source: Neubecker 1933.

Theo van der Zalm, 24 August 2000

The border appears to be as wide as 1/7th of the total width.

Santiago Dotor, 25 June 2002


Standard of the Heir Grand Duke c.1903-1918

Standarte des Erbgrossherzogs

[Standard of the Heir Grand Duke c.1903-1918 (Hesse, Germany)] 1:1
by Theo van der Zalm and Santiago Dotor
Flag adopted c.1903, abandoned 1918

The heir apparent's flag was the same as the grand duke's, the lion however without sword. Source: Neubecker 1933.

Theo van der Zalm, 24 August 2000


Standard for Other Members of the Royal Family 1903-1918

Standarte des Großherzoglichen Hauses

[State Flag and Standard for Other Members of the Royal Family 1903-1918 (Hesse, Germany)]
by Jaume Ollé

A horizontal triband red-white-red, ratio of stripes 1:2:1. At the center the uncrowned lesser arms of Hesse, in each corner a golden crown. Illustrated National Geographic 1917 p. 367, no. 1002.

Norman Martin, April 1998

Both National Geographic 1917, Znamierowski 1999 and Neubecker 1933 show in the corners antique crowns (with only four arches, of which only three visible, and no central dip). Jaume Ollé's image shows the crowns as modern royal crowns (with eight arches, of which only five visible, and a central dip). Maybe this was the 1903-1913 model, and the one using antique crowns the 1913-1918 model? Also, National Geographic 1917 calls it national standard and places it close to the royal standards of Prussia, Bavaria, Württemberg and Saxony, which might lead one to think that it was the grand ducal standard of Hesse.

Santiago Dotor, 25 July 2000

The former pattern [of standard for princes and princesses] was continued for the other princes. The shield from the new state arms was placed in the white stripe. In the corners on the red stripe four princely crowns (with only bows [arches?] each). Source: Neubecker 1933.

Theo van der Zalm, 24 August 2000

According to Neubecker 1933, ill. 172, this was also the state flag (Staatsflagge und Standarte der Prinzen).

Santiago Dotor, 18 June 2001

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