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Rhineland-Palatinate (Germany)

Rheinland-Pfalz

Last modified: 2005-02-12 by
Keywords: germany | rhineland-palatinate | rheinland-pfalz | prime minister | ministerpräsident | coat of arms: tierced per pile (cross: red) | coat of arms: tierced per pile (wheel: white) | coat of arms: tierced per p |
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[Rhineland-Palatinate (Germany)] 2:3
by Marcus Schmöger
Flag adopted 18 May 1947



See also:


Introduction

Sources:

Marcus Schmöger, 22 October 2001


Description

The flag of Rhineland-Palatinate was designed in 1947 after the foundation of this Bundesland [by] the French High Commisssioner to Germany. It symbolizes the dedication of Rhineland-Palatinate to Germany (therefore the black-red-gold tricolour) as well as the democratic traditions of Germany. These colours were seen first in this combination during the so called Hambacher Fest (a demonstration at the ruins of the Hambacher Schloß castle [Palatinate]) in 1832. So the Palatinate is very much connected to these colours.

Moreover these three colours are predominant in the coat of arms of Rhineland-Palatinate. This coat of arms shows the signs of the predominant powers in the region before the French Revolution:

The crown consists of leaves of wine and shows the importance of this good for local agriculture.

Milko Hensel, 20 July 1998

The well-known black-red-gold triband with the coat-of-arms in the canton is both the Landesflagge (civil flag) and the Landesdienstflagge (state flag), as also happens with Lower Saxony and Saarland. My image above of this Hißfahne (hoisted flag) is made according to the appendix to the 1972 Law. The proportions must be 2:3.

Marcus Schmöger, 22 October 2001


Vertical Flags

Hängefahne and Banner

[Rhineland-Palatinate, short vertical variant or Hängefahne (Germany)]      [Rhineland-Palatinate, long vertical variant or Banner (Germany)]
both by Marcus Schmöger

The vertical variants are different from the respective variants of other Länder, as the coat-of-arms is not in the center, but in the canton. This was first prescribed in the Law of 1972, but probably used de facto much earlier. In the appendix to this law there are drawings of a Hängefahne and a Banner. The caption to these drawings says:

Hängefahne and Banner are usually longer than these patterns show. These are only relevant for the placing of the Land coat-of-arms on the flag.
Early variants of the hanging flags had the coat-of-arms in the center, not in the canton, as shown on a 1948 photo in Kuhn 1991.

Marcus Schmöger, 22 October 2001

What are the relative dimensions of the arms, distance to the top and hoist etc.? If the hanging flag (shown here as 2:1) and the banner (shown as 3:1) can have other proportions than those shown, what is the difference between them?

Santiago Dotor, 23 October 2001

There are no indications neither in the text nor in the drawing in the appendix regarding these dimensions. Regarding what differences the Hängefahne and the Banner, basically nothing (at least not the proportions)! The same thing happens with the construction sheet of the Mecklenburg-West Pomerania vertical flags. Probably somebody in one of the German Länder drew the hanging flag and banner like that somewhere in the past, and everybody issuing a new law or regulation just copies it. The only difference between Hängefahne and Banner is the way they are hoisted (horizontal flagpole or crossbar). The proportions do not differ in a straightforward way.

Marcus Schmöger, 23 October 2001


Prime Minister

Ministerpräsident

[Prime Minister (Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany)] 1:1
by Jaume Ollé, coat of arms by Mario Fabretto

Square flag with the arms in the center of the tricolor and with a gold border.

Norman Martin, April 1998

German square flag with Land arms. 30 × 30 [cm] for the minister president (with golden border). 30 × 30 [cm] for the Parliament president (with argent [i.e. silver] border) and 24 [sic - "25"?] × 25 [cm] for the State minister, with border red. Source: Harmignies 1987.

Jaume Ollé, 29 July 1999

Land arms in the middle, covering the three stripes (mainly the central one). In fact, the president of the regional parliament uses the same flag as the minister-president, that is with a golden border. The flag for the state minister is 25 × 25, and it is also used by the vice-president of the local parliament. (...) Also in fact, the red border doesn't appear for technical reasons on these flags which have a red border. Source: personal and legal archives, with legislation and official documents from the German Länder, as well as the informations of Jürgen Rimann, the best German specialist for all the car flags in the world and a very reliable source.

Pascal Vagnat, 1 August 1999

Car flags (Autoflaggen) in Rhineland-Palatinate are a difficult subject. I will discuss them in detail later on, when I have more conclusive information. The car flag of the Ministerpräsident as shown above is basically correct.

Marcus Schmöger, 22 October 2001

According to the information from the Landesarchiv Koblenz there are no car flags in Rhineland-Palatinate.

Klaus Günther, 23 October 2001

However, Jürgen Rimann has photos of the car flags. At least they have been in existence for some time.

Marcus Schmöger, 26 October 2001


Car Flag for Government Officials

[Car Flag (Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany)]
N.B. the above image is wrong, the coat-of-arms should extend to the upper and lower stripes
by Jaume Ollé

Service flag for use by the government president, state secretary, and higher dignitaries, when is used in car (shield in center instead of canton).

Jaume Ollé, 4 October 1998

Rectangular (German flag with Land arms) for the chancellier and State secretary, 18 × 25 [cm] with red border. Triangular is for the district presidents, 20 × 25 [cm], red border). Source: Harmignies 1987.

Jaume Ollé, 29 July 1999

Land arms in the middle, covering the three stripes (mainly the central one). (...) The "chancellier" is actually the director of the chancellery. Also in fact, the red border doesn't appear for technical reasons on these flags which have a red border. Source: personal and legal archives, with legislation and official documents from the German Länder, as well as the informations of Jürgen Rimann, the best German specialist for all the car flags in the world and a very reliable source.

Pascal Vagnat, 1 August 1999

Car flags (Autoflaggen) in Rhineland-Palatinate are a difficult subject. (...) However, all car flags show the arms in the center extending to the upper and lower stripe, so the image shown above [de-rp_vf.gif] is definitely wrong. Especially for this rectangular flag (18 × 25 cm) I have no detailed information, though.

Marcus Schmöger, 22 October 2001

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