mostbet
This page is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website

Royal Standards 1816-1918 (Württemberg, Germany)

Standarten des Königlichen Hauses

Last modified: 2004-12-29 by
Keywords: württemberg | royal | banner of arms | antlers: 3 (black) | crowns: 4 (royal) | crowns: 3 (royal) | canton (schaumburg-lippe) | stripes: 9 | panel (white) | coat of arms (württemberg) | disc (white) | wreath: oli |
Links: FOTW homepage | search | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors




See also:


Royal Standard 1894-1918

Standarte des Königs

[King's Standard 1894-1918 (Württemberg, Germany)] 1:1
by Jaume Ollé, modified by Santiago Dotor

Square yellow flag, in the center, 3 black stag half-horns, antlered. In four corners, a royal crown.

Norman Martin, May 1998

According to the description on Ströhl 1897, p. 80, the standard with the antlers replaced the former one in 1894. Duke William (1848-1921) from another branch of the house of Württemberg took over in 1891 after the death of King Charles (1864-1891) as William II. (...) William II and Charlotte of Schaumburg-Lippe had only a daughter so (according to Salic law) the right to the throne passed to the branch of Duke Albrecht in 1921.

Theo van der Zalm, 12 June 2001

The publisher of the Flaggenbuch 1905 was Moritz Ruhl who also published his own flag plates. In his 1902 edition he forgot the crowns in the king's standard, which he corrected in the following edition 1906. The standard without crowns was that of the princes.

Ralf Stelter, 17 June 2001


Queen's Standard c.1897-1918

Standarte der Königin Charlotte, geboren Prinzessin von Schaumburg-Lippe

[Queen's Standard c.1897-1918 (Württemberg, Germany)] 1:1
by Jaume Ollé and Santiago Dotor

Square yellow flag, in the center, 3 black stag half-horns, antlered. In three corners, a royal crown, in canton a small white-red-blue square tricolour.

Norman Martin, May 1998

The king's standard had four crowns while the queen's was defaced with a white-red-blue canton showing the livery colours of her lineage (she was born Princess of Schaumburg-Lippe). National Geographic 1917 illustrates the king's standard with four crowns, and shows a dotted line marking the canton, as if to explain something which it does not. Znamierowski 1999 also shows the royal standard as having four crowns and no canton.

Santiago Dotor, 18 July 2000

Santiago Dotor is right, especially considering (a) the Landesfarben of Schaumburg-Lippe were white-red-blue and (b) King Wilhelm II of Württemberg married Charlotte of Schaumburg-Lippe in 1886. This suggests that the earliest date for the standard with the canton (at least the white-red-blue canton) would be Wilhelm's succession in 1891.

Norman Martin, 27 July 2000

This flag appears in Neubecker 1933 as Standarte der Königin Charlotte, geb.[oren] Prinzessin von Schaumburg-Lippe i.e. Standard of Quenn Charlotte, born Princess of Schaumburg-Lippe.

Santiago Dotor, 12 June 2001

William II married secondly in 1886 Charlotte of Schaumburg-Lippe. Ströhl 1897 does not mention her standard, so I think it was not yet in use in 1897.

Theo van der Zalm, 12 June 2001

Flaggenbuch 1905 colours [of the canton] might be wrong. White-red-blue were always the colours of Schaumburg-Lippe, and not light blue, even if Flaggenbuch 1905 shows it. The illustration in Neubecker 1933 shows the canton white-red-blue. The publisher of the Flaggenbuch 1905 was Moritz Ruhl who also published his own flag plates. Sadly he only gives the king's standard and not the queens's.

Ralf Stelter, 17 June 2001


Standard of the Princes 1894-1918

Standarte der Prinzen

[Standard of the Princes 1894-1918 (Württemberg, Germany)] 1:1
by Jaume Ollé and Santiago Dotor

The publisher of the Flaggenbuch 1905 was Moritz Ruhl who also published his own flag plates. In his 1902 edition he forgot the crowns in the king's standard, which he corrected in the following edition 1906. The standard without crowns was that of the princes.

Ralf Stelter, 17 June 2001


King's Standard early 19th century, possibly 1816-1864

Standarte des Königs

[King's Standard early 19th century, possibly 1816-1864 (Württemberg, Germany)] ~5:6
by Theo van der Zalm and Santiago Dotor

This is the royal standard of Württemberg from Siebmacher 1878. In Steenbergen 1862 this same flag with the arms with a crowned helm and supported by lion and deer is given as flag of the king. As King Charles I used the crowned helmet with mantling and his predecessor William I (born 1781, reigned 1816-1864) did not, this standard could belong to king William I and the following to King Charles I.

Theo van der Zalm, 12 June 2001

The above image shows the standard of the royal house, in black and white in Siebmachers Wappenbuch 1878. This same one I saw also in Steenbergen 1862. There it bears however the greater arms as decreed in 1816.

Theo van der Zalm, 15 June 2001


King's Standard mid-19th century, possibly 1864-1894

Standarte des Königs

[King's Standard mid-19th century, possibly 1864-1894 (Württemberg, Germany)] 1:1
by Theo van der Zalm and Santiago Dotor

The above image is described by Ströhl 1897, p. 80, as used up to 1894. I drew it looking at the contemporary military standards in Neubecker 1933. On coins and military standards issued by King Charles I a deviation from the state arms is used: helm with mantling and more romantic than classical style. Therefore I suppose that the standard in Steenbergen 1862 is King William I's and supposedly King Frederick before him. The standard described by Ströhl 1897 then would be King Charles I's.

Theo van der Zalm, 12 June 2001

According to Ströhl 1897, the king's standard was introduced in 1894. Before that the standard was black over dark red, 4m × 4m with a white central medallion of 2m diameter with the state coat-of-arms. The medallion was surrounded by a wreath of olive branches bound with a black-red ribbon.

Ralf Stelter, 17 June 2001

Mostbet