mostbet
This page is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website

Britain in the "Book of All Kingdoms"

Last modified: 2010-01-22 by
Keywords: britain | book of all kingdoms | escocia | scotland | england | inglaterra |
Links: FOTW homepage | search | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors



See also:


Escocia

[Flag of Escocia] image by Eugene Ipavec, 31 December 2009

The 20th flag mentioned and illustrated in the Book of All Kingdoms is attributed to "Escocia" (Scotland). This as depicted in the 2005 Spanish illustrated transcription, a red flag with three yellow lions (facing the hoist, passant but not guardant) in the ogival default shape of this source. I'm quite sure this is a gross mistaking of the Banner of England for a flag proper to Scotland, though the second half of the 14th century witnessed some English penetration in Scottish matters.

The anonymous author of [e9s50] describes the flag thus: "El rey d’esta Escocia á por señales un pendón bermejo con tres leones de oro luengos, como aquí se sigue.": And the King of this Scotland has for sign red pendon with three long lions, as follows.
António Martins-Tuválkin, 12 November 2007

National Geographic (1917) notes that the flag may represent the English Plantagenet family, perhaps mistaken by the writer as David II of Scotland was married to  Joan of England (Joan of the Tower), who was the youngest daughter of Edward II. The speculation is that her banner of arms was mistaken for the banner of the King of Scotland.
Phil Nelson, 12 November 2007


Inglaterra (England)

[Flag of Inglaterra] image by Eugene Ipavec, 18 December 2009

The 21st flag mentioned and illustrated in the Book of All Kingdoms is attributed to "Inglaterra" (England). This as depicted in the 2005 Spanish illustrated transcription, a quartered British royal banner (under "Henry IV (1399-1413)", with text stating that this was used up to 1485) of arms in the ogival default shape of this source.

The anonymous author of the Book of All Kingdoms describes the flag thus: "E el rey d’estas tierras a por señales un pendón a cuarterones. En los dos cuarterones á flores de oro en campo azul porque es el rey de la Casa de Francia; en los otros dos cuartos ay en cada uno tres onças de oro luengas, e el campo bermejo como estas que siguen.": And the King of these realms has for sign a pendon with quarterings. In the two quarterings there are golden flowers on a blue field because the King is of the House of France; in the two other quarters there are on each three golden long leopards and their field is red as these which follow.
António Martins-Tuválkin, 12 November 2007

Mostbet