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British shipping companies (L)

Last modified: 2005-03-12 by rob raeside
Keywords: lloyds | link line | london and overseas freighters | london and rochester trading | london court line | lyle shipping |
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Link Line

[Link Line houseflag] by Jarig Bakker, based on the website of the National Maritime Museum.

From the website of the National Maritime Museum, "the house flag of the Link Line Ltd., Liverpool. A rectangular flag, divided into black and yellow with a black letter 'L' in each yellow quarter. The flag is made of nylon fabric. It has a cotton hoist and is machine sewn. A rope and toggle is attached. The design is based on the International Code signal flag 'L'."
Jarig Bakker, 19 August 2004


Corporation of Lloyds

[Lloyds houseflag] by António Martins, 28 March 2000

[Lloyds houseflag] by António Martins, 28 March 2000

A company flag of Lloyds. From: I. O. Evans 'The Observer Book of Flags', 1959: 'The St. George's Cross, red on white, distinguishes a number of civic flags associated with London. That of the city of London bears in the canton, in red, the sword which beheaded St. Paul <...> On the shield which forms the badge of the Corporation of Lloyd's the Cross and Sword of London City are placed above a foul anchor in gold. Lloyd's signal stations fly a blue ensign with this badge in the fly; Lloyd's burgee for boats places it in the canton of a long pennant whose field shows a St. George's Cross with its arms traversed by a narrow blue cross.'
Jarig Bakker, 21 December 1999

Lloyd's boats were entitled to fly a Blue Ensign with their badge: Admiralty Warrant 9th September 1882. This is now used only ashore at Lloyd's offices and occasionally at Gibraltar Signal Station.
David Prothero, 27 December 1999

I chanced upon some more information about Lloyd's flags in ADM 1/8950.

1882. Admiralty Warrant for Blue Ensign with Lloyd's badge in the fly. 9 Sep 1882.

1894. Lloyd's asked for permission to fly a white ensign with a blue overall St George's cross and their badge in the fly (presumably in the fourth quarter). Admiralty refused to allow it for use on boats because it would have been too much like the RN White Ensign, but did not have the authority to ban its use on signal stations. However Lloyd's dropped the idea.

1896. Admiralty approved white ensign with Lloyd's badge in the fly and no overall cross for Signal Stations. Flags of this design had probably been in use since 1894.

1900. Admiralty suggested that this flag should not be flown.

1904. Admiralty agreed that there was no harm in this flag being flown at Signal Stations abroad.

1914. Use of Lloyd's white ensign abandoned.

There is some inconsistency here in that Admiralty are said to have no authority over flags ashore, but are then approving a flag for a Signal Station. I think the explanation is that although the Admiralty's authority legally extended only to flags flown at sea, and on rivers, lakes and inland waters, they claimed the right to regulate the use of any flag that looked similar to a maritime flag. Thus yacht clubs that had warrants for Blue or Red Ensigns defaced with their club badge in the fly, were not allowed to fly them ashore at their club-house. RN barracks could fly the White Ensign because they were considered to be extensions of ships-of-war, but Dockyards and Naval Hospitals had to fly the Union Jack. An exception was made for Customs and Excise who were allowed to fly the Customs ensign on Customs Houses.
David Prothero, 29 January 2000

An incorrect image of a supposed Lloyds flag as a red ensign was found in a series of Danish stickers issued by Danmark Coffee Co. (circa 1935).
Ole Andersen, 21 December 1999 The Lloyd's badge on a blue disc on a Red Ensign is an error. It is perhaps a misinterpretation of the Admiralty Flag Book. Badges that appeared direct on Blue or Red Ensigns, but did not appear on UJs, were shown on a blue circle or red circle respectively. David Prothero, 30 December 1999

Lloyd's Yacht Club was founded 1938 and granted the defaced Red Ensign 1950.  Here is a picture of it in use from http://www.bellandclements.com/whatsnew/.
David Prothero, Ole Anderson
, 28 March 2003

A photo of the Lloyds of London white ensign can be seen at the Port Cities website and of the blue ensign also at the Port Cities website.
Jan Mertens, 20 February 2005

Lloyds of London Burgee

[Lloyds houseflag] by António Martins, 25 February 2005

Burgee based on Mystic Seaport website, but the current Lloyds Yacht Club website shows the burgee without the red cross.
Jan Mertens, 21 February 2005


London & Overseas Freighters Ltd.

[London & Overseas Freighters Ltd. houseflag] by Jarig Bakker, based on the website of the National Maritime Museum.

From the website of the National Maritime Museum, "the house flag of London & Overseas Freighters Ltd., London. A pennant divided horizontally into white over blue with a red five-pointed star in the centre. The flag is made of a wool and synthetic fibre bunting. It has a cotton hoist and is machine sewn. A rope and toggle is
attached."
Jarig Bakker, 20 August 2004


London & Rochester Trading Co. Ltd.

[London and Rochester houseflag] by Jarig Bakker, based on the website of the National Maritime Museum.

Shown on the website of the National Maritime Museum, as the Crescent Shipping line, this is the flag of the London & Rochester Trading Co. Ltd., Rochester, as depicted in Loughran (1979) with proportions 2:3 instead of 1:2 as on the Museum site.
Jarig Bakker, 10 August 2004


London Court Line Ltd.

[London Court Line Ltd. houseflag] by Jarig Bakker, based on the website of the National Maritime Museum.

From the website of the National Maritime Museum, "the house flag of London Court Line Ltd. A rectangular white flag bearing a black tower and crescent. The flag is made of a machine sewn, wool and synthetic fibre bunting. The tower motif and the hoist are made of cotton fabric. A rope and toggle is attached. The Court Line Group purchased tankers from 1963 and these carried a blue house flag with a bird design.

The line was a tramp shipping company founded in 1905 by Philip Edward Haldinstein and based on London. His ships were all called after country houses with the suffix 'Court'. The fleet expanded greatly in the 1920s and was badly affected by the depression, many vessels being laid up. The company moved into bulk carriers in the 1960s and tankers. The company changed its naming scheme with new vessels having the prefix 'Halcyon' and also its livery. The group's diversified interests in airlines, package holidays, shipbuilding and repairing led to cash flow problems. As a result it went into liquidation in 1974."
Jarig Bakker, 20 August 2004


Lyle Shipping Co. Ltd.

[Lyle Shipping Co. Ltd. houseflag]
by Phil Nelson, 11 April 2000

from Stewart and Styring's Flags, Funnels and Hull Colors 1963

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