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Political Parties (Singapore)

Last modified: 2003-05-10 by
Keywords: singapore | politics | people's action party | ray | circle (blue) | hammer | circle (yellow) | text: english | text: chinese | text: malay | text: tamil |
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People's Action Party

[People's Action Party (Singapore)]
by Ivan Sache

Smith 1975, pp. 340-341 ("Symbols in politics"): "White field with a centered thick blue circle vertically crossed by a red flash". According to Encyclopaedia Universalis CD-ROM (1998):

Several successive constitutions were worked out until the adoption of the Constitution of 3 June 1959, following elections won by People's Action Party (PAP), whose leader, Lee Kuan Yew, became Prime Minister. The goal of PAP was then independence by the way of merging with the Malay Federation, realized on 16 September 1963. Difficulties increased during 1964: racial troubles and bloody fights in summer in Singapore, Indonesian aggressions and acts of sabotage all the year long against Singapore and Malaysia. The results of these troubles was the proclamation of independence in Singapore on 9 August 1965. Since then, all elections have given most seats if not all to PAP, whose muscled democracy manages Singapore like a major company with astonishing performance: total control of medias, controlled strikes, rapid industrial development, port activity leading in the world, main financial market of South-East Asia, firm basis of ASEAN, urbanization unique in the world on such a scale etc... On 28 November 1990, Lee Kuan Yew, the founding father, was replaced by Goh Chok Tong, a brilliant technocrat who places the future of the State-city under the sign of interna[tiona?]lization.

Ivan Sache, 6 August 1999


Singapore Workers' Party

[Workers' Party (Singapore)]
by Guillermo Tell Aveledo

Besides the People's Action Party, it has been the only Singapore party to form a government. This was a long time ago, before the full independence of Singapore. The current flag shows a golden hammer inside golden circle over red.

Guillermo Tell Aveledo, 14 September 2000

Workers' Party 1950s-1960s

[Workers' Party (Singapore)]
by Guillermo Tell Aveledo

Version from the 1950s-1960s, before the People's Action Party won power in Singapore. It bears, over a red field, a black and white hammer on the centre, and the name of the party in all four languages of Singapore: English, Malay, Tamil and Chinese I am unsure about the meaning of the Chinese characters on the hoist side. The details of the hammer on the actual flag were richer.

Guillermo Tell Aveledo, 14 September 2000

The vertical Chinese words read (from top down) Dao Da Qu it should sound something like "dao-dar-chee". Dao Da roughly translates as 'to oppose' or more accurately 'to counter-attack'. Qu means 'zone' or 'area'. So put together, it says that this is a area where opposition takes place.

Edmund Leong, 5 May 2003

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