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Venezuela - Historical Flags (1810-1817)

Last modified: 2003-11-08 by
Keywords: venezuela | miranda | caracas | cumana | costa firme |
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1810 Flags

Flags of the Junta Defensora (or Conservadora) de los Derechod de Fernando VII (Later Junta Revolucionaria), 1810.

After Napoleon's expansion to Spain, and the abrupt usurpation by Jose Bonaparte of the Spanish crown, the Spanish Empire had, suddenly, its head on the run. Trying to find a defense against the usurpers, the people's  of the Empire, alliances with England were made. But, mainly, Juntas which invoked to "Defend the Rights" of the Spanish king, Ferdinand VII were established. This situation, so agobiating in the Kingdom, was to be reflected all over the Empire. "Orphan and desperate", the imperial nations, and their criollo establishment, found a keen time for their autonomical aspirations to come into reality. Around April of 1810, a French Emmisary arrives to Caracas to ask the Captain General Emparan and the Cabildo for their allegiance to King Jose Bonaparte. The events unfolded nicely for the autonomical side, as, de facto, the links with Spain were broken. The Caracas Junta, previous to the declaration of Independnece (which did not occur on April 19th, 1810, but months later), adopted on May 3rd the flags of these Juntas. Miranda's
tricolori was adopted on his arrival a year later. Description as follows:


by Guillermo Aveledo , 3 October 1999

This flag, three equal stripes, had the same colours of the primitive Miranda's tricolori , but in the following order: red, yellow and black, with the king's initials on the yellow stripes (F-VII). The red and yellow stood for the Spanish Colours, common to all, and the black our alliance with England. This flag was also used as a cockade and an arm band among the revolutionaries.


by Guillermo Aveledo , 3 October 1999

Same as the previous flag, this one depicts an effigy or portrait of the King Ferdinand VII (usually rendered handsomer than he was; (I tried to remain faithful, but it was a very small field.)"to whose freedom the combined efforts of both nation and the general vows of the Americas are devoted".
Source: 1981 edition of "Los Simbolos Sagrados de la Nacion Venezolana", by Francisco A. Vargas
Guillermo Aveledo
, 3 October 1999

Armband of the Venezuelan Revolutionaries (1810): The so called "Suprema Junta Conservadora de los Derechos de Fernando VII" (Supreme Council Conservative of the Rights of Fernando VII) in Caracas, dictated an agreement to establish an armband tricolor horizontal red, yellow and black that show the initials or picture of the monarch in the center of the yellow stripe and which they had to bear on the left arm all whatever were committed to preserve the royal prerogatives in these lands; but in the long run it was only a transitory emblem that it gave happened to that they ended up constituting genuine exaltation of the Venezuelan nationality.
Raul Orta, 15 May 2002

Flag of the Supreme Council Conservative of the Rights of Fernando VII, 1810, its an arbitrary and later interpretation of the cap badge which really approved that Council like a exceptional concession for the bearing of the Venezuelan subjects after April 19th. Here we present both versions: the one that only show the number or abbreviation of the monarch and the one where is includes, in addition, his portrait.
Raul Orta, 6 June 2002

Flag of the Caracas Patriotic Council


by Raul Orta, 6 June 2002

Flag of the Caracas Patriotic Council, 1810, is refers by Mr. Jaume Olle in his "Electronical Bulletin of Vexillology from Catalonia". Part: Historical flags / Venezuela - Reus, Spain-Catalonia 1999. It can be only an artistic interpretation of the Mirandian Flag of America.
Raul Orta, 6 June 2002


1811 Flags

Mother Flag


by Antonio Martins, 3 Febuary 2000
based on image from <www.puroveinte.com> located by Jarig Bakker , 13 September 1999

In 1811, Venezuelas First Congress declared independence, and adopted Mirandas flag as first Venezuelan flag.
Jorge V. Alonso-Iglesias

Mother Flag - 1811 - Were been from a Commission appointed to the effects by the Constituent Congress of the American Confederation of Venezuela, in which in addition to Miranda they appeared Lino de Clemente and Jose de Sata y Bussy. It vexillography is characterizes by the inequality of it stripes and the emblem on the canton whose main figure is an Indian female that holds a lance crowned by a Phrygian Cap. It is known like "Mother Flag" because of it were born in addition the current Flags to the Republics of Colombia and Ecuador.
Flag of the Liberator Army  - 1811 / 1819 - Is the same Flag of 1811 omitting the emblem of the corner because of the same development of the Venezuelan War of Independence.
National Cockade (1811): Adopted jointly with the so called Mother Flag and product of the same commission that conceived it on July 1811, the first National Cockade consisted of three concentric circles: red (outside), yellow (wider in center) and sky-blue (inside).
Raul Orta, 4 April 2002 and 15 May 2002


Uncertain Variant
by Raul Orta, 6 June 2002

1811 Venezuelan Flag as referred by the Venezuelan Historian Jerónimo Martínez-Mendoza, is a uncertain version of the so called "Mother Flag" because its description on the "Gazeta de Caracas" (Caracas Bulletin) dated on July 14th, 1811 not mention the existence of stars. It may have relation with the Venezuelan Flag of 1863.
Raul Orta, 6 June 2002

Venezuela was founded July 5th, 1811 and adopts like flag the unequal tricolor Yellow, Blue and Red with the emblem to the corner that already we knows and it stayed effective until the fall of the so called Venezuelan First Republic in 1812. In 1813 and with the support of a portion of New Granada that had reached certain autonomy, Bolivar invades Venezuela crossing the Andes and develops a fast but victorious march that leads it to Caracas where was conferred he the title of El Libertador. We cannot doubt that indeed the Flag of New Granada was hoisted by the troops who accompanied Bolivar; but it was not adopted by Venezuela like own. In the case of Venezuela, the Tricolor Flag stayed over the ups and downs of the stabilization of our autonomy and highly probable that was raised with the New-Grenadinian one on the combat operations lead by Bolivar during the so called Campaña Admirable (Admirable Campaign) in 1813. Still more: in a famous picture, when Girardot death on Bárbula he is sustaining the tricolor yellow, blue and red tricolor, and strictly speaking it cannot be assumed like a fact but like artistic license subject to confirmation. The Second Republic was established in 1814 an surely then was re-adopted the 1811 Venezuelan Flag without the emblem in the canton.
Raul Orta, 11 June 2002

Mirandian Flag of America


by Dov Gutterman, 15 May 2002

Mirandian Flag of America, (1811): In order to commemorate the first anniversary of the April 19th, 1810 revolution, the members of the Patriotic Society organized a manifestation that concluded in the Plaza Mayor (Great Square, today Bolivar Square) of Caracas. Miranda, hoisting a yellow cloth, headed one performance of citizens covered with showy plumages similarity of the Indians ones to represent the innocent America revolting against the declining Spanish monarchy.
Raul Orta, 15 May 2002

Banners of the Independence War


by Raul Orta, 15 May 2002


by Raul Orta, 15 May 2002

Banners of the Independence War (1811-1824): In order to intimidate the enemy, it seems to be that some patriotic corps fixed to its lances small black banners bearing in occasions the emblem of the skull and the crossed bones, whereas in others brought the phrase: LIBERTAD O MUERTE (Liberty or Death), motto that according to says El Libertador Simon Bolivar took for himself.
Raul Orta, 15 May 2002


1813 - 1814 Flags

War until Death Flag, 1813: is refers by Mr. Jens Pattke in a  poster of Historical Flags of Venezuela. One comments that its reproduction exists in a Museum of Bogotá, Colombia. We considered that is strange patrimonial and morphologically to the Venezuelan Historical Vexillology. (see: Colombia - Historical Flags).
Republic of New Granada, 1814-1819: is refers by Mr. Jens Pattke in a poster of Historical Flags of Venezuela. Although it has been possible to appreciate in some illustrations of the Bolivar's Admirable Campaign, for us it seems strange patrimonial and morphologically to the Venezuelan Historical Vexillology. (see: Colombia - Historical Flags).
Raul Orta, 6 June 2002

Technically, the flag of 1811 stayed in suspense and was reassumed in 1814, probably without the emblem in the Canton.
Raul Orta, 17 June 2002


1815 Flags

Costa Firme, Spanish Maritime Province


by Jaume Ollé

Spanish Marine Province of Costa Firme (Coro): presumably used between 1815 and 1819, is refers by Mr. Jaume Olle in his "Electronical Bulletin of Vexillology from Catalonia", Part: Historical flags / Venezuela - Reus, Spain-Catalonia 1999. Until now, in Venezuela and Spain does not seem exist any specialized registry that guarantees its existence.
Raul Orta, 6 June 2002

Caracas, Spanish Maritime Province


by Jaume Ollé

At J.W Norie - J.S. Hobbs: Flaggen aller seefahrenden Nationen, 1971 [nor71] (original print 1848):
278 Carraccas - Yellow before blue.
Peter Hans van den Muijzenberg, 12 November 2001

Spanish Marine Province of Caracas: presumably used between 1815 and 1819, is refers by Mr. Jaume Olle in his "Electronical Bulletin of Vexillology from Catalonia", Part: Historical flags / Venezuela -
Reus, Spain-Catalonia 1999. Mr. Peter Hans van den Muijzenberg, refers it to J.W Norie - J.S. Hobbs: Flaggen to aller seefahrenden Nationen, 1971 (first printing 1848). Until now, in Venezuela and Spain does not seem exist any specialized registry that guarantees its existence.
Raul Orta, 6 June 2002

Cumana, Spanish Maritime Province


by Jaume Ollé

Adopted: c. 1815. Abolished: 1819.
Jaume Ollé

At J.W Norie - J.S. Hobbs: Flaggen aller seefahrenden Nationen, 1971 [nor71] (original print 1848):
279 Cumana.
Peter Hans van den Muijzenberg, 12 November 2001

Spanish Marine Province of Cumana: presumably used between 1815 and 1819, is refers by Mr. Jaume Olle in his "Electronical Bulletin of Vexillology from Catalonia", Part: Historical flags / Venezuela - Reus, Spain-Catalonia 1999. Mr. Peter Hans van den Muijzenberg, refers it to J.W Norie - J.S. Hobbs: Flaggen to aller seefahrenden Nationen, 1971 (first printing 1848) 279 Cumana. Note that safe by the width of its strips, is similar to the Tragic Flag of Miranda. Until now, in Venezuela and Spain does not seem exist any specialized registry that guarantees its existence.
Raul Orta, 6 June 2002

Flags According to Steenbergen Book (1862)


by Jaume Ollé, 27 September 2003

No. 1015 - Cumana.
Source: [stb62].
Jaume Ollé, 27 September 2003


by Jaume Ollé, 12 October 2003

No. 1046 - Caracas (Spain) [Then obsolete]
Source: [stb62].
Jaume Ollé, 12 October 2003


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