mostbet
This page is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website

Dictionary of Vexillology: R (Rememberance Flag - Running Eye and Toggle)

Last modified: 2010-01-02 by phil nelson
Keywords: vexillological terms |
Links: FOTW homepage | search | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors



On this page:


REMEMBRANCE FLAG
See ‘memorial flag 2)’.

REPEATING FRIGATES
The 18th Century term, now obsolete, for those frigates that were stationed outside or behind the main line in a fleet of sailing warships in order to relay flag signals to ships out of view of the flagship (see also ‘flagship’ and ‘signal flag’).

Please note that in the context of the above definition a frigate was a naval vessel which carried her main armament of 28 – 50 guns on a single deck.


RESERVE ENSIGN
See under ‘ensign’.

RESPECTANT
See ‘appendix V’

RETREAT CEREMONY
In military usage, a formal ceremony requiring a full guard and band for lowering the national flag at the end of the day on special occasions (see also ‘reveille’ and ‘sunset’).

Please note that this ceremony has its roots in late Medieval and early Renaissance period with the formal ceremonies associated with closing the gates of fortresses and castles for the night.


REVEILLE
In UK, US and some other military usage, the ceremony of hoisting the national flag at the start of a day and taken from the name of the bugle call sounded to awaken the troops (see also 'colours 5)' and 'retreat ceremony').

REVERSE
The less important side of a flag that is generally, but not invariably, a mirror image of the obverse. A distinctive reverse design or charge will usually only be found on unique flags, ceremonial flags, regimental colours and similar, there are however, occasional exceptions - see 'double-sided' and 'two-sided'.(also ‘ceremonial flag 1)’. ‘colour 2)’, ‘obverse’ and ‘unique flag’).

REVERSED
1) On flags, the term is used to refer to a charge or charges that run in the opposite direction to that in which they are normally placed (see also ‘reversed chevron’, ‘reversed pall’ and ‘reversed pile’).
2) In heraldry, as above but the term is also used when arms or a charge are reversed or turned downward – debased, everted, inverted, subverted, subvertant or transposed.

REVERSED CHEVRON
See ‘chevron’.

REVERSED PALL
See 'pall'.

REVERSED PILE
See ‘pile’.

REVERSED TRIANGLE
See ‘triangle’.

RHOMBUS
See ‘lozenge’.

RIBBON SCROLL
1) Generically, see ‘scroll’.
2) Specifically, the term used for a narrow ribbon in the form of a scroll but of greater length than is usual); it is normally (but not exclusively) placed below and/or around the shield in a set of armorial bearings or an emblem, and is generally inscribed with a motto – for example, those on the flags of the US states of Iowa and Massachusetts (see also ‘scroll’).

Iowa Massachusetts
Flag of the State of Iowa, US; Flag of the State of Massachusetts, US (fotw)


RIKSBANNER (or RIJKSVAANDEL)
See ‘coronation flags’.

RING
1) A charge in the form of a narrow circular band typically used to separate a sun’s central disc from its rays, as in the flags of Macedonia and Taiwan - a torus (see also ‘disc’ and ‘cartouche’).
2) A piece of wood or metal for attaching a windsock to its pole and for keeping it open (see also ‘windsock’).
3) See ‘battalion ring’ and ‘battle honour’.
4) One of a number of circular metal bands used as an increasingly (but not entirely) obsolete method of attaching a military colour, parade flag or gonfalon to its staff - see ‘colour 2)’, ‘parade flag 2)’ with its following notes and ‘gonfalon 2)’.

Please note that the heraldic term for this type of charge is an annulet, but we suggest that a suitable glossary or heraldic dictionary be consulted for its correct usage.

ring Taiwan naval ensign Macedonia
Naval Jack of Taiwan (fotw); National Flag of Macedonia (fotw)


RISING
See ‘appendix V’.

RISING DIAGONAL
See ‘ascending diagonal’.

ROD OF ASCLEPIUS
See ‘Staff of Asclepius’.

ROGACINA
In Middle European heraldic usage, the Polish term for a charge in the form of a stylized arrowhead or spear point, often with a decorated shaft and generally (but not invariably) pointing upward (see also ‘shafted’ and ‘barbed’).

ceremonial flag - Cieszkσw, Poland arms - Cieszkσw, Poland flag - Baranσw, Poland arms Ropczyce-Sedziszow, Poland flag - Ropczyce-Sedziszow, Poland
Ceremonial Flag and Arms of Cieszkσw, Poland (fotw); Flag of Baranσw, Poland (Jarig Bakker): Arms and Flag of Ropczyce-Sedziszow, Poland (fotw)


ROPE GROMMET
See ‘grommet 3)’.

ROUNDED FLY
See ‘lanceolate’

ROUNDED SWALLOWTAIL
See ‘descate’.

ROUNDEL
1) A circular emblem of nationality employed on military aircraft and Air Force flags, generally (but not exclusively) consisting of concentric rings of the national colours and based on the cockade (see also ‘aircraft marking(s)’, ‘cockade 2)’, ‘fin flash’ and ‘national colours 2’). See supplemental note
2) A non-circular emblem of nationality employed by some nations in the same way and for the same purpose as 1) above – for example that of the United States and of The Philippines.
3) A heraldic term for a disc, particularly (but not exclusively) one that is a colour rather than a metal - see ‘disc’ (also ‘bezant’ and ‘plates’).

Argentina Columbia Colombia Philipines Japan example Apples, Switzerland
From left: Aircraft roundels: Argentina; Belgium; Colombia; The Philippines. Japan (fotw); Example; flag of Apples, Switzerland (fotw)

Please note with regard to 3) that in strict English heraldic usage this term should only be employed when the charge described is a colour not a metal (see ‘tinctures’ in ‘appendix III’).


ROYAL COMMAND FLAG (or BANNER)
In Swedish usage, a banner of the royal arms (thus differing from the normal Swedish royal standard) and flown in the presence of His Majesty the King when attending military functions, or when acting in his honorary capacity as commander in chief of Sweden’s armed forces (see also ‘banner 1)’ and ‘royal standard(s) 1)’).

Royal Command Flag, Sweden Royal Standard, Sweden
Royal Command Flag, Sweden (fotw): Royal Standard, Sweden (fotw)


ROWEL
See ‘star 2)’.

ROYAL BANNER
See ‘royal standard 1)’ and following note..

ROYAL COLOUR (or COLOR)
See ‘colour 2)’ and ‘colours 2)’.

ROYAL PLATE
In British Royal Naval usage and some others, the royal equivalent of a flag disc and used on boats in place of the appropriate royal standard when full ceremonial is not required (see also ‘flag disc’ and ‘royal standard’ below).

flag disc
From left: The Plates of The Duke of Edinburgh; The Prince of Wales and of Other Members of the Royal Family, UK (Graham Bartram)

Please note that in British Royal Navy usage a boat with Her Majesty The Queen on board never carries a royal plate, but always flies the royal standard which requires full ceremonial.


ROYAL STANDARD(S)
1) That flag, frequently a banner of arms, which signifies the presence and/or authority of the monarch (see also ‘banner 1)’, ’personal flag 1)’ and ‘presidential standard’ – but see note below).
2) In the plural, a term sometimes applied to the flags flown by other members of a royal family – the queen’s, crown prince’s standard etc.
3) In UK military usage, the official name of the state colour of the Grenadier Guards – but see ‘state colour 2)’.

[royal flags]
From left: UK Royal Standard (Martin Grieve); Denmark Royal Standard (fotw); Crown Prince’s Standard, Japan (fotw)

Please note that this term has been defined in 1) above according to current UK usage, but should, strictly speaking, only be applied to Royal Standards of the heraldic pattern as detailed herein under ‘standard 3)’ and ‘standard 4)’, and the term “Royal Banner” employed where more appropriate (see also ‘banner 1)’).

royal standard Richard III of England
The Heraldic Standard of King Richard III of England (fotw)


ROYAL TRESSURE
See ‘double-tressure’.

RUDDER STRIPES
See ‘fin flash’.

RULE OF TINCTURE
Most authoritative sources agree that good flag design should obey the heraldic Rule of Tincture, and it is therefore stated in brief here: A colour should never be placed on a colour or a metal (that is silver and gold in heraldry and generally white and yellow in flags) on a metal. Metal may, however, be placed on colour and colour on metal. It is, none the less, strongly suggested that those more deeply interested in this subject should refer to the entries on ‘tinctures’, ‘metal’ and ‘fur’ given in Appendix III, and to consult a dictionary of heraldry for a more complete description.

RULES OF ETIQUETTE
The rules governing flag etiquette (or the protocol governing flag usage) vary slightly from country to country, but are stated briefly in Appendix II (see also ‘flag code’, ‘flag etiquette’, ‘flag law’ and ‘precedence’).

RULES OF RESPECT
The rules that govern respect for the national flag may be summed up in a Golden Rule, which simply stated says that the national flag should be treated with respect at all times. The particulars of what exactly this respect entails vary in detail, legal status and extent, from country to country, however, the general principles remain the same and a full list is given in Appendix II.

RUNNING EYE AND TOGGLE
A traditional method, of hoisting a flag much favoured in European countries, whereby a rope is sewn into the heading fitted with a wooden toggle at the top and a loop or eye splice at the bottom that fastens them to their opposites on the halyard – toggle and becket (see also ‘becket’, ‘eyesplice’, ‘hoistline’, and ‘toggle’).

Introduction | Table of Contents | Index of Terms | Previous Page | Next Page

Mostbet